Power Training: Bumping the Force/Velocity Curve

I wanted to give a little more detail about Power Training and Muscular Movember and how to properly structure an exercise plan around it.

DISCLAIMER!
Always make sure to properly warm up before starting your power program! ALWAYS!
Try jogging for 10-15 minutes or perform dynamic stretches. (avoid static stretches that will cause the muscles to stretch out more, effecting your force production)
Also make sure you are completely comfortable and familiar with power movements, or have a qualified spotter/workout partner. (You don’t want to hurt yourself!)

There are two main types of power training, that can be further separated into light or heavy load:
Multi-effort – training for multiple reps
Single effort – training for fewer reps

Power training is a good method for fat burning, since every movement is done at a rapid pace. Power training also helps with reaction time – training the brain, nerves, and muscles to react faster. This type of training is very beneficial to higher level athletes looking to increase speed or vertical jump.

Single-Effort Power:

Light Load

  • Order: Multi-joint movements goal specific
  • # of exercises: 2-4
  • Reps: 4-10
  • Sets: 3-6
  • Load: 50-80% 1RM
  • Rest: 2-6 min
  • Frequency: 2-3 times per week
  • Duration: 2-6 weeks

Heavy Load

  • Order: Multi-joint movements goal specific
  • # of exercises: 2-4
  • Reps: 1-3
  • Sets: 3-5
  • Load: 80-90% 1RM
  • Rest: 3-5 min
  • Frequency: 2-3 times per week
  • Duration: 2-6 weeks

Mutli-Effort Power:

Light Load

  • Order: Multi-joint movements goal specific
  • # of exercises: 2-4
  • Reps: 4-10
  • Sets: 3-6
  • Load: 30-50% 1RM
  • Rest: 2-6 min
  • Frequency: 2-3 times per week
  • Duration: 2-6 weeks

Heavy Load

  • Order: Multi-joint movements goal specific
  • # of exercises: 2-4
  • Reps: 3-5
  • Sets: 3-5
  • Load: 75-85% 1RM
  • Rest: 2-5 min
  • Frequency: 2-3 times per week
  • Duration: 2-6 weeks
These are resistance training variables for different types of power, and you’ll want to choose the one that works best for your goals. If you’re training involves a lot of movement, you’ll want to use the multi effort method; less movement (once or twice) would work best with the single effort training method.
DON’T FORGET! Remember to warm up! If you’re not properly trained for power training, have a trainer nearby to coach you! Power training has great benefits, but can cause injuries without proper knowledge! If you have any questions or concerns, feel free to send me an e-mail!

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Steven Moore About Steven Moore

Passionate Personal Fitness Trainer, and NASM Corrective Exercise Specialist at Blitz Conditioning. Prone to spurts of random nonsense. [Read my full bio]

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